Archive for letters

The real reason nothing’s been done on immigration

illegal

About 10 years ago, I was writing a story about construction and landscaping, and I interviewed the CEO of a fairly large construction company.

He asked that the conversation go off the record for a few minutes as we began to talk about the labor force.

“People in this business hire immigrants,” he told me. “They work hard and they do good work. No one wants to see that change, so you won’t see real immigration reform until the construction, landscaping and other industries want it to happen.”

He told me he hired only legal immigrants, but that much of the industry hires anyone with a Social Security card, and many employers don’t want to know if it’s fake.

And a whole lot of immigrants have fake documentation, which means they’re paying Social Security and other taxes, but they aren’t eligible for any government safety net programs. Even without false ID, immigrants pay sales taxes, gasoline, and through their landlords, property taxes.

Some employers knowingly hire people who aren’t here legally, knowing they can abuse them without any consequences. How many employees will choose to complain when they know it could lead to deportation and the loss of any chance to stay here?

I think my off-the-record source was right. I think big business wants this below-poverty work force to stay. Apparently, free trade isn’t enough; they want what is essentially slave labor here in the US.

According to a study in the journal, “Public Health,” at least half of all current farm workers are undocumented. That makes it easy to abuse them, to withhold pay for little or no reason, to intimidate them with threats of deportation and worse.

Little has improved for migrant farm workers since the documentary, “Harvest of Shame” aired on CBS in 1960. Housing and pay are still substandard, worker rights are pretty much nonexistent, abuse is rampant.

One farmer told CBS News, “We used to own our slaves; now we just rent them.”

Here in North Carolina, we have children working in tobacco fields, and the nicotine that’s being absorbed into their bodies is enough to poison them.

Instead of having compassion for immigrants, we see them as criminals, yet we tolerate the businesses that bring them in by the truckload and abuse them.

President Obama wants to do something about the mess, but Congress refuses to help in any way. There is at lease one bipartisan bill that could pass, but House Speaker John Boehner refuses to bring it to the floor for a vote.

So when President Obama vows to make changes via executive order, the Republicans accuse him of acting like an “emperor,” despite the fact that every president since Eisenhower has taken executive action on immigration — including the precious right-wing icon, Ronald Reagan.

What we’re talking about here is human life. These are people who, like our own ancestors, are desperate for a better life, and they’re being exploited by the greed of big business.

But big business also wants us to hate the people they’re exploiting so that they can continue to exploit them. If we feel compassion, we might rise up and demand action. I’m sure that’s why several of the major networks won’t carry the president’s speech tonight. Better we all believe the lies corporate media are spoon-feeding us than any of us wake up and demand to know what the hell is going on here.

 

We have the Congress the non-voters deserve

These to NC State Representatives got sent home on Election Day because people came out to vote.

These two NC State Representatives got sent home on Election Day because people came out to vote. When people vote, change is possible.

To all of you who stayed home on Election Day because you felt your vote wouldn’t count, well, it damn well didn’t.

Thanks a lot.

Now we have a right wingnut Senate to go along with the right wingnut House in Washington.

Did you see the damage voter apathy caused in North Carolina these last two years? Well, get ready for it on a national scale. The Democratic-controlled Senate won’t be there to fight the right-wing agenda.

There will be attacks on the Affordable Care Act, Medicare, federal nutrition programs, education, jobs programs, Social Security — everything people who don’t make a living wage need to stay alive.

Oh, and we won’t see any increases in the minimum wage, either.

So, how did this happen?

First of all, only about one-third of eligible voters came out on Election Day. Someone who’s good at math told me the Senate changed hands with only 19 percent of the popular vote.

So, now we have the crazy legislative branch of a corrupt third-world country, and they own the judiciary.

So, why did the Democrats lose?

Well, how many did you hear stand up and say they were proud to have helped expand access to health care? How many told stories of the people whose lives are being saved every day because of the Affordable Care Act?

Most of the Dems ran away from President Obama, who has accomplished so much despite having both hands tied behind his back by an obstructionist Congress.

No one stood up and said they were proud to stand with the president who rescued a collapsed economy, saved the auto industry, ended two wars, presided over the longest period of uninterrupted job growth in history, halved the national deficit, expanded access to health care for millions of Americans, saving tens of thousands of lives a year in the process.

Instead we let the mainstream (corporate) media write the narrative, and our candidates ran away from an “unpopular” president.

We need to stop being ashamed of what we want for America and its people. We should stand proudly with this president, and let me point out that those candidates who did that won elections.

For those candidates who shied away from progressive values, let me just say you helped elect people who believe in evolution and deny science on every level. You helped elect people who see pregnancy resulting from rape as a blessing. We have elected officials in Washington who believe climate change is a hoax and who think fracking is good for the economy and the planet.

We have lawmakers who think only sluts want to use contraception.

Here in North Carolina, we sent a man to the US Senate who had just a 9 percent approval rating in his previous job.

This can NOT end well.

Let me end by saying we here in Buncombe County, NC, showed the country how to get it done this election.

Two of our three representatives in the state House of Representatives were right-wing politicians who voted not to expand Medicaid and to fast-track fracking, among other damaging laws. They both had big money behind them, and one was slated to become Speaker of the House.

But two local men, Brian Turner and John Ager, decided to oppose them. Neither took corporate money, both went door-to-door, held marathon phone banks, activated the grass roots. John Ager’s campaign made 2,000 phone calls on Election Day to remind people to get out and vote. We told the truth while big money lied, and the voters came out in force.

We turned out the vote for these two men and they won. They beat the big-money candidates by letting people know their votes could make a difference.

That’s how you get it done, and that’s how we need to get it done on a large scale.

 

 

Saying thank you

Publication1

I’ve seen lawn signs recently that say, Hagan=Obamacare, and I wonder why people think that’s a bad thing. I want to erect a sign that thanks Kay Hagan for her vote, and it should dwarf the one below it.

The Affordable Care Act has the potential to save 45,000 American lives a year. It would have saved my son.

Because of “Obamacare,” my husband and I have insurance. Before the law, we would have been out in the cold because he’s had heart surgery and I have asthma. His layoff last year could have been a death sentence for both of us, since we had insurance through his job.

I got to thank Sen. Kay Hagan in person this morning for her vote for access to health care for millions of Americans. She was in Asheville at Edna’s Coffee Shop, which I love even without knowing what strong progressives its owners are.

I also got to pet Edna (the pug for whom the shop is named) and thank the owners for sponsoring the event.

I don’t agree with Sen. Hagan on everything; I’m to the left of her on a lot of things. But she stands strong in favor of access to health care for everyone. Her opponent, Thom Tillis opposes that. He also opposes any minimum wage, not to mention a living wage. He was the architect of a disastrous legislative session that, in addition to refusing to accept Medicaid expansion, took away voting rights, de-funded education to an alarming degree, slashed unemployment compensation, closed women’s health clinics and passed one of the most restrictive voting laws in the country.

So far, Democrats are coming out in droves to vote before Election Day. We need to keep that up. We need to vote. All of us. Believe me, we can’t afford to have anyone sit this one out.

 

 

 

 

It’s time to put up or shut up.

i voted

Early voting has begun here in North Carolina, and if the first day was any indication, it looks like we might have a good turnout this year.

That’s good news. In years with high turnout, the right-wing, corporate, anti-life candidates do poorly.

And this year, there’s a lot at stake, including the very existence of the Affordable Care Act, if the Republicans take the Senate. The House has voted 50 times to repeal it; if the Senate votes the same way, we’re in trouble.

I don’t know why any woman would vote for a candidate who would take away her right to make reproductive choices. This group has closed women’s health clinics across the country under the guise of being “pro-life.”  But if they’re really pro-life, why do they deny poor women cancer screenings?? Many of them are saying a business should have the right to fire a woman for taking birth control pills.

If you think this can’t become reality, think again. The Right has its Supreme Court in place. This is a court that has already said it’s OK for a boss to deny insurance coverage for birth control.

And that’s just one issue. Most of these people are bought and paid for by big business and the 1 percent. They want to abolish minimum wage. They want to abolish what’s left of our shredded safety net and our public education system.

These are the people who are trying to cut the number of people eligible to vote, and they’re attacking the people who most likely would vote against them — the poor, the elderly, people of color and college students.

Just look at the battle for keeping a polling place on the campus of Appalachian State in Boone, which has 18,000 students: http://billmoyers.com/2014/10/23/north-carolina-fights-take-voting-site-away-pesky-college-kids/.

They have reduced voting hours; they have cut early voting and eliminated Sunday voting (which is when many African-Americans voted); they have closed polling places and reduced the number of voting machines in places where people traditionally voted against them.

They have eliminated straight-party voting, which means it will take a few moments longer. That will make lines longer and reduce the number of people who can vote. They have made it easier for someone to challenge your vote. Even if you still get to vote, the challenge has taken time and slowed the line.

And what’s important about slowing the line is that, no matter how long the line is when the polls close on Election Day, the doors close one hour after the stated closing time. That means if you’re in line an hour and one minute after the polls are supposed to close, you don’t get to vote.

You won’t find long lines in wealthy polling places because the people who would stifle your voice have the majority of those votes in the bag.

This is why it’s so important that you vote and vote early. There are lines for early voting, but not nearly as long as the lines will be on Election Day.

The time is over for anyone to be uninterested in politics. You must become aware of what’s happening in the world around you. You must care enough about what’s happening in this country, and you must vote to keep our Democracy alive.

In Kansas, the Right, under the “leadership” of Sam Brownback, they have destroyed the state’s economy and Sen. Mitch McConnell has said he wants to make that a national priority.

Schools are being destroyed, food banks emptied, unemployment insurance all but eliminated. If this is your idea of what a successful society looks like, then go ahead and stay home. Otherwise, get your ass to the polls. Do it early. Do it today.

 

 

What a day!

My friends Jan and Angie Buchanan and their son, Jasper, with Rev. Dorri Sherill

My friends Jan and Angie Buchanan and their son, Jasper, with Rev. Dorri Sherrill

I’m feeling more than a little overwhelmed with joy today, as I congratulate a whole bunch of newlyweds.

Late yesterday afternoon, a judge overturned Amendment One, the regrettable attempt to institutionalize bigotry against LGBT folks.

I didn’t get to stay for the weddings, which happened in the evening, but I did get to share a wedding day with friends.

The first wedding was that of my friends Lauren White and Amy Cantrell, who were married by the Rev. Lisa Bovee-Kemper. Friends standing nearby held the couple’s twin daughters. The wedding was delayed for a few moments by a dirty diaper, but Lauren says that’s just the beautiful mess that her life is now.

The girls are just 8 months old and had no appreciation of the history being made by Amy and Lauren, who were arrested last year for applying for a marriage license and refusing to leave the Register of Deeds office.

This time, the Register of Deeds, Drew Reisinger, was near tears of joy as he issued licenses and dozens of people cheered nearby.

Jan and Angie Buchanan, who have been together for 13 years, finally were able to make their life commitment legal.

And possibly the most beautiful thing was that no haters showed up to spoil this beautiful wedding day. They stayed over at City Hall with a Christian Flag, while we definitely felt a sacred spirit a few blocks away at the County Office Building.

People opposed to these marriages held a press conference accusing Drew of breaking the law by staying open late to issue the licenses. It seems a little like Gov. George Wallace standing in the doorway to attempt to keep African-Americans out of the University of Alabama. He was trampled by history and these people will be as well.

To be honest, when I wrote a column calling for marriage equality 16 years ago, I didn’t think it would happen in my lifetime.

I wanted my sister and the woman she loved to be able to enjoy all the rights and benefits my husband and I have and it made no sense that they were being denied because of people’s religious bias. That’s unconstitutional.

I got a ton of hate mail and “Christians” calling me to quote the Bible as backup for their hate.

I quoted Jesus right back at ‘em. I grew up Baptist. Don’t think you can beat me in an argument by quoting the Bible. Once I have quoted you passage for passage, I’ll throw the First Amendment at you because your religion isn’t supposed to trump people’s rights in this country.

My sister lived in Massachusetts and was able to marry the love of her life before she died eight years ago. I can’t even put into words how important that was to me (and to her and my sister-in-law).

So, as I stood with friends who finally were about to realize their dreams yesterday, I was overwhelmed with emotion — as I still am.

As Rev. Barber has said on many a Moral Monday, “What a day!”

Leslie Boyd is a former newspaper reporter who has become an activist for social justice issues. E-mail her at leslie.boyd@gmail.com.

 

 

 

We still need the Women’s Movement

womwn's pa

It’s a more than even chance that our next president could be a woman. As the old cigarette commercial said, “You’ve come a long way, Baby!”

But we haven’t come far enough, as this graphic from the National Women’s Law Center shows. Just look at the pay disparities, especially among women of color.

When I started working in daily newspapers in 1982, I was paid $50 a week less than a man in the same level with the same experience.

I complained and got a raise, and later found out he got a raise, too, to keep his paycheck larger than mine. He was after all, a man, and I was just a women.

It was assumed that I was just working for spending money, even though I had two children to feed, clothe and shelter and my coworker was unmarried and lived with his mother, whose house was paid off.

It didn’t matter. I deserved less because I’m a woman.

And that’s not all. I had to have a “note” from my doctor — in addition to the prescription — saying my prescription for the Pill was for medical reasons and not birth control, while men were able to get testosterone treatment without any special requests.

Until the mid-1970s, an unmarried woman in Massachusetts couldn’t get birth control. If she did, she wasn’t the one punished, though; it was her doctor who faced charges.

Most of the people who make the decision to force women’s health clinics to close are men, and they do it under the guise of being “pro-life,” — even though nearly all of what these clinics do is provide health care to women who have no other place to go for well-woman checks, contraception and cancer screenings.

Here in North Carolina, legislators have led a fierce and prolonged attack on women’s rights.

Remember the so-called Motorcycle Safety Bill that shut down virtually every women’s health clinic in the state? That bill contained precisely 17 words about motorcycles. The rest was all about denying women their right to health care and to legal abortions.

Women make less money than men, and now we have less access to quality health care.

Some legislators are talking about making birth control pills non-prescription, supposedly so women can have greater access. But making them over-the-counter will mean insurance policies can’t cover the cost. Women will have to pay the full price, not just a co-pay.

More women live in poverty than men, partly because we make less, but also because we usually are the ones who care for our children and men all too often get out of paying sufficient support for their children.

It’s time for us to stand up and put a stop to this attack on our health care, our reproductive rights and our incomes. We need to work together, and we need women of all ages, not just women who fought the fight 50 years ago.

 

The world is watching

Michael Brown's body remained in the street for several hours after he was shot and killed in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 8.

Michael Brown’s body remained in the street for several hours after he was shot and killed in Ferguson, Mo., on Aug. 8.

I heard a man say today that he was visiting in-laws in South Korea and they wanted to know what the hell is going on in this country. Why would police shoot an unarmed young man and then leave his body in the street for hours?

Back before the Civil Rights Movement, young black men were lynched and left to sway from the branch of a tree for hours as spectators had their photos taken with the “strange fruit,” as Billie Holiday sang.

Again and again, police who are armed to the teeth, or lone vigilantes, kill unarmed black men and get away with it. These men are shot, choked, beaten, and most have committed no crime, or certainly not a crime that warrants the death penalty.

Yesterday was the 59th anniversary of the lynching in Money, Miss., of 14-year-old Emmett Till, whose mother, Mamie, insisted he have a public funeral, and that the casket be left open so the world could see the mutilated body of her child, savagely beaten and murdered because someone said he whistled at a white woman.

African-Americans still live in fear, a fear few of us white people can understand.

A couple of weeks ago, my friend Evelyn Paul, a middle-aged white woman, was driving with a young black man in her car.

“I didn’t have the cruise control on because we were in town, and I was going over the speed limit,” she told me. “When the officer stopped me, I leaned over to get my registration from the glove compartment.”

Her passenger panicked.

“Sit up and put both hands on the wheel!” he said. “Don’t reach for anything until they tell you to!”

She had never considered that reaching into the glove compartment would be a threatening gesture.

“I’m a 50-year-old white woman,” she said. “I’ve never been considered a threat — except for when I was in the General Assembly Building and was arrested.”

I never had to teach my sons to not reach for anything until asked. I never had to teach my sons to keep their hands visible all the time when encountering a police officer. Hell, I was able to teach my sons that police officers were the people you seek when you’re in trouble.

White privilege is something most of us don’t even see in our lives; we’re oblivious to the slights people of color endure every day.

But the rest of the world is not. They see what happens to young black males. They know we imprison black people at a rate unseen anywhere — even in apartheid South Africa.

We have a school-to-prison pipeline that most whites aren’t even aware of. Kids in poor, primarily black neighborhoods can be sucked into the justice system just for missing school, and once there, they can struggle for years to get out. By then, they have a criminal record, so when they’re discriminated against in the job market, in housing, at the voting booth, the excuse is that they’re criminals.

Michael Brown had made it through high school without being entangled in the “justice” system; he was to have started college in two days when he was gunned down in the street by a police officer who is still being paid while the incident is being investigated.

As a mother who has lost a child, I know some of what these kids’ mothers feel. My son’s death was unjust. It never should have happened. But I imagine it’s worse to have your child gunned down or strung up. I don’t know how these mothers stay on their feet. My heart breaks for them.

I propose we all start calling these deaths what they are. Let’s be honest, they are lynchings.

 

 

 

 

I won’t vote for a bigot

Tom HillAfter the Democratic primary, I posted that I believed we had made a mistake nominating Tom Hill for Congress in the 11th District of NC.

I still believe that to be true.

Tom has accused me of being a one-issue voter and a one-issue blogger because I won’t vote for anyone who opposes marriage equality. I wouldn’t vote for a racist, either, and I am NOT accusing Tom of being a racist.

Tom is an accomplished man, but he stands on the wrong side of an issue that is very important to me, even though he is on the right side of many other issues.

His comments in response to my blog post show me that he is just plain wrong for the job. Instead of trying to open a conversation, he immediately assumed I am a one-issue voter. He could have read previous posts. He could have read subsequent posts. Instead, he chose to label me based on his own prejudices. He chose to lump me in with racists and insist I don’t care about other issues. He chose not to listen to my response. These are not the traits I want in someone I would choose to represent my interests.

I am convinced that he is wrong for the job. I will write in someone’s name rather than give him my vote. Just look at the comments below:

“WE” did not make a mistake by choosing Tom Hill in the 2014 primary. You and other one issue people did all that you could to defeat my open and honest campaign based on closing off-shore tax shelters, ending the Mid-East wars, reforming immigration with a pathway to citizenship, protecting Social Security and Medicare, supporting women’s and veterans’ rights. cleaning up the environmental messes, rebuilding the nation’s crumbling infrastructure, and other meritorious Democratic goals. And you did so by supporting a candidate who never once stated his position on any of these issues. But what really frosts me is your intolerance for people whose values may disagree with your own. Whether or not my district endures another two years or more of Mark Meadows will depend in part on whether one issue people like yourself are able to demonstrate some maturity. BTW, you have the option of running for office yourself rather than sitting on your butt and finding fault with those who do. I do not see your personal identifier anywhere.

TOM HILL

  • Tom, my sister was a lesbian who endured the hatred of people who didn’t know her. She and her spouse deserved the same rights my husband and I enjoy. As for one-issue, I am NOT. If you knew me at all, you would know my biggest issue is health care. But I have a great deal of trouble voting for anyone who would deny basic human rights to people based on a religious prejudice.

    Leslie

  1. Leslie,

    Despite your denial, your response proves that you are a one-issue blogger. You deny the truth, just like the Obama haters deny that they are racists. You did not address a single matter that I raised, and I will not trade quips with you on the only issue that truly concerns you. BTW, we all have gays in our families. Some of us just have different opinions about the meaning of marriage, irrespective of religion.

    Tom

    • My son died because he was denied care. A birth defect — a pre-existing condition — prevented him from getting insurance and he was denied care and died. To call me a single-issue blogger again proves that you are responding with a knee-jerk reaction — another bad quality for a politician. Did you look at previous posts on this blog? I am a multi-issue voter, and basic civil rights is important to me. You have shown yourself to be a religious bigot. You have shown yourself to be overly sensitive to people who disagree with your bigotry against an entire class of people. I agree with most of your stands on the issues, but you do not have the personal traits necessary to hold high office and I am deeply offended by your insistence that I only care about one issue, even when I have shown myself to be a mullti-issue voter, You look no deeper than the surface, see what you want to see and let your bias run wild. You will not get my vote. Oh, and these comments are public.

      Leslie

Living in a police state

ferguson

Looking at the photos and footage of Ferguson, MO., reminds me of a war zone — almost any war zone. Tanks, tear gas, smoke bombs …

I remember the uprising in Hungary of 1956. I was 4, but I remember the tanks rolling down the streets toward unarmed civilians. I remember my mother crying because the US wouldn’t intervene. It is one of my earliest memories.

In Ferguson, it started with the murder of an unarmed 18-year-old. Would he have been slain if he was white? I doubt it.

Police say he went for the officer and tried to take his gun; a witness said his hands were in the air when he was shot.

Michael Brown was two days away from starting college. He was not a thug.

When people came out to protest, they were met with police in riot gear, police who assumed they would be violent, and when people became combative, they were met with military force.

The mayor has refused to identify the police officer who shot Michael Brown, fearing for the officer’s safety. Well, what about the safety of our teenagers?

Oh well, it was a mistake. Why is everyone so upset?

It upsets me because of the frequency with which black men are shot, choked and beaten by white police officers.

It upsets me because the media always look for the least flattering photo of the person who was killed.

Oh look. He’s wearing a hoodie. Guilty!

It upsets me when people who knew and loved him become outraged and demonstrate against the police tactics and they are met with a full-on war machine.

This isn’t the billy clubs of the 1968 Democratic Convention; these are tactics used in combat.

The county’s police chief trained in anti-terrorist tactics in Israel in 2009. What he learned and what his happening is war waged against citizens.

According to reports, police fired tear gas and rubber bullets near a crew from the TV network Al Jazeera America. In a statement, the network said that “Al Jazeera is stunned by this egregious assault on freedom of the press that was clearly intended to have a chilling effect on our ability to cover this important story.”

Two reporters were arrested while they were in a McDonald’s. They later were released without charges being filed, but the police got what they wanted out of it: fewer reporters on the scene to witness and tell the world what’s happening.

I had the privilege to hear the Rev. Dr. James Cone speak a few weeks ago. Cone is the “father of Black Theology,” and he was speaking about his latest book, “The Cross and the Lynching Tree.” 

As I listened to Cone and as I read his words, I come to understand that lynchings are still going on in this country, and I have begun to call the deaths of unarmed black men just that.

As I participate in Moral Mondays and develop close friendships with people of color, I become more aware of racism in our society. I see how my friends are treated. I hear what people say.

I realize I have been insulated, even though I thought I was aware of the racism around me before this last year. I saw the institutional racism and the injustices in our “justice” system. But I know now it goes deeper than I ever imagined.

Old friends tell me I am being radical, but I disagree. Black men are shot, strangled and beaten by police at an astronomically higher rate than whites. A few months ago in Durham, NC, police claimed that a young black man who had been searched and was handcuffed in the back of a police car, had shot himself in the head. When people turned out to protest, they were met with police in militarized riot gear.

Last week, a middle-aged African-American man with asthma was choked to death when he tried to stop police from beating another man. I saw that one because somebody videoed it.

I saw video of police beating two men on private property because they were videoing the officers with their cell phones.

The police are supposed to be there to protect us, but now they are working to silence us and to hide their own actions.

I understand that police have to prevent violence from spreading, but maybe they could prevent it by not killing innocent black men and boys.

Maybe if police told the truth from the outset. “Yes, it appears an innocent person was shot and killed. The officer is under arrest.”

Would people be as quick to riot then?

Yesterday on Facebook, a white man commented on a thread that black people should understand that justice will prevail.

It’s nice to be white and believe that, but if you’re not white and/or wealthy, there is little justice for you. And if you protest, you will be met by military force.

 

Media are fudging the numbers

DSC_0128 (2) (800x536)

The second Mountain Moral Monday was exhausting and energizing. We estimate a crowd of about 8,000, although the newspaper here estimated less than half that amount.

I see it as an effort to minimize the effect the Moral Movement is having across the state. Police estimated 5,000. Last year we had 10,000; the police estimated 8,000; the paper kept saying “more than 6,000.”

For a year they used that low-ball estimate of “more than 6,000″ — until yesterday, when they gave last year’s estimate as 10,000 and said the crowd was only 3,500 this year.

I wrote a letter to the editor to complain about the coverage:

To the editor:

“I find it interesting that the paper used the “police estimate” of 3,500 for this year’s crowd, and then used others’ estimates of last year’s crowds of 10,000 for this year’s story. 

“For the past year, the paper has used its estimate of 6,000. Apparently, when you can make the movement look smaller and less important, it’s OK to use everyone else’s estimate.

“The crowd was slightly smaller than last year, but well over 6,000, and no less enthusiastic.  As Rev. Barber said, it isn’t about the numbers, but about the Movement.

Also offensive was the word ‘feisty’ when referring to Lindsay Kosmala Furst’s speech. You would never never have used that word to describe a man’s speech. The word to describe her speech is ‘impassioned.’”

I would only ask the paper to make sure its coverage is accurate and that someone read the copy looking for words that might be sexist, racist or otherwise offensive.

Had I been assigned the story, I would have made a call to the police at the end of the rally and asked for a crowd estimate. Then I would have called the organizers for their estimate and printed both.

In my nearly three decades as a reporter, I found police usually under-estimated the size of the crowd and organizers generally over-estimated. Rarely did they agree. I printed both numbers or I printed a number halfway between the two if the estimates were close.

Also, if you get an estimate at the beginning of the event, it will be low, since people continue to stream in for at least a half hour.

These are very simple reporting rules if you believe accuracy is your main goal. However, if your goal is to discredit a movement, you go ahead and use tricks like those used in this morning’s paper.

So, let’s giver the paper the benefit of the doubt and say this us unintentional. That would make it something less than competent journalism, and that is most disappointing.

 

 

 

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